Category Archives: Beaches

Visiting Forster, on the New South Wales Mid-North Coast

Forster, NSW, is a delightful coastal town ideal for families looking for a beach vacation, along with a variety of unique near-by local attractions and boating activities.

Forster Highlights and Features

Green lawns of a golf course with palm trees throughout, and sand dunes in the background
Looking across the golf course at Forster to the sand dunes at the end of the One Mile Beach.
  • The best time to visit Forster depends on the activities you are planning. Forster weather, according to my grandfather who lived there for about 40 years, is paradise all the time.
  • Summer average maximum temperatures are around 27 degrees Celsius, while winter temperatures range from around 8 or 9 degrees overnight, to an average of around 18 in the day.
  • Forster Main Beach and One Mile Beach are Forster’s main beaches. Both have car parks, toilets and BBQ facilities. Forster Main Beach also has an enclosed pool ‘nestled’ into the break wall, known as Forster Ocean Baths.
  • Families interested in camping can visit the Booti Booti National Park, where they can also bike and hike through some spectacular scenery.
  • Take a tour of the Great Lakes Winery to try some local wines.
  • Go on a morning dolphin watching cruise aboard the Amaroo and watch hundreds of common dolphins mass offshore. A spectacular sight.
  • Car enthusiasts will enjoy The Curtis Collection Vintage Car Museum. You can look at the first Australian car, artifacts from the two World Wars, vintage motorcycles and much more.
  • There are lots of boat charters in Forster for families interested in fishing for bream, whiting and salmon.
  • At the Ton O Fun park, kids can enjoy paddle-boat and train rides, exhilarating water slides and riding on quad bikes.

 

Forster’s One Mile Beach has good surfing at the Northern end, while it is patrolled (October through April) at the Southern end. It can also be hazardous for the unwary, with persistent rips.

 

Classic curvey beach photo, with a strip of people swimming in the middle where the beach is patrolled, and a beach umbrella in the foreground
Forster Main Beach is known for good surf, and has a patrolled area in the swimming months (October – April).

 

large rectangular pool built into a break wall with grass on one side and waves breaking just beyond.
The Forster Ocean Baths is at the end of Forster Main Beach closest to the change rooms and has a large grassy area on one side.

Karpathos Day 3: Meeting the Neighbours, plus Photo Blog of Lefkos Beach

Pomegranates on a tree
There were pomegranates on a tree just near our house.

There is a house right next to ours in Pyles, with a large courtyard out the front, where the children and I have just been entertained with pomegranates, chocolate wafer bars and stories of the owner’s grandchildren and his renovation woes. He is currently renovating the house (and not, I think, living there), and was waiting there today for someone  to come help him with the kitchen, but he had not arrived.

He told me that getting work done on Karpathos is very slow. “Greeks in Greece don’t like to work,” he said. He said the Greeks in other countries – Australia, America, Germany – work very hard. But here in Greece they want to play cards, go to the cafeneio, talk.

He also said that the economy here on the island is not too bad, but in Athens, in the cities, very bad. Lots of people without work. Of course, that’s what then launched him into his spiel about Greeks in Greece not liking to work, but then I’ve frequently heard people in Australia complain about ‘dole bludgers’ who (supposedly) don’t really even want jobs. It was interesting to hear his take on things though.

He broke up two pomegranates for us to eat, scraping all the segments into a bowl, and cut up two or three small apples – all grown by him I think. I gorged myself on pomegranate because the children didn’t eat much (Mikaela tried only one tiny segment), and I suspect the polite thing here is to eat everything you are served, though I must look that up the next time the internet cafe is open. When I had to go to get Elli to bed (when we could hear her crying – she and Chris were still at home), he made me take the rest of the pomegranate with me, tipping it into my hands, and said to leave the kids who were busy playing on his grandchildren’s toy pedal quad bikes. They came home not much later though. I hope they said proper thank yous!

Written later on:

Today has been filled with gifts of traditional or homemade Greek food.

First there was the visit next door, with the pomegranate Liam had been so wanting to try.

Later, while I was nursing Eliane to sleep, I heard someone come to the door. It turned out to be someone Chris had met at the mini market the previous evening, bringing some of his homemade wine, that he thought had come out too dry, but that Chris might like, since he didn’t like the sweet wine they sold at the shop.

In the afternoon we went to Lefkos Beach, but then in the evening we went down to the local cafeneio, owned by one of our host’s nephews (the father of the woman we met yesterday who lives behind us). It appeared to be a bit of a boys club, with the nephew who had met us at the airport sitting outside on the veranda with a group of men, including his brother, the owner, and not a woman in sight, however they invited us to sit down and chatted on.

After a while their sister, who we had met a couple of days earlier, but who had only a little English, came by. She didn’t sit down but stood on the stairs chatting animatedly with her brothers and asking us what we’d been doing and how was the water (at the beach) and making much of Mikaela, in particular, with her ‘beautiful eyes’, which Mikaela withstood stoically.

She then brought out a plate of small cakes/biscuits smothered in icing sugar, and passed them around, insisting on giving Eliane a second one, then getting a wet cloth to clean her up as the icing sugar spread all over her! Her brother explained to us that her daughter had been accepted into law school today so she was treating everyone to these cakes in celebration. While she was there our backdoor neighbour came by and gave us a bag of baklava her aunt had made that day ‘for your breakfast tomorrow’ – when we got home we discovered there were 20 of these treats! Luckily they have no nuts or sesame paste, just the pastry with the sugar/honey syrup, otherwise it would probably just be me and Elli eating them! (Edited to add: we managed to get through them all over the next couple of days, and they were Yum!)

Next thing the mother of the law student (another of our backdoor neighbours aunt’s, now I think of it) wrapped up the remaining cakes and told us to take them for breakfast too, but not before taking back any cakes she had made the men take that were still uneaten, which she then also pressed on us!

Luckily Liam, Elli and I all liked them, but I had to quietly eat Chris’s when no-one was looking, because it had nuts in it, and Mikaela had two lollies (off the same plate), but didn’t try a cake.

While I am sitting here writing all this on my iPhone, drinking the (I’m sorry to say) pretty awful homemade wine we were given, I’m listening to a bazooka player who is just across the lane way from us and feeling properly grateful to be here. It seems like half the town are related to our friends back in Canberra, and the rest all know who we are. They have been incredibly welcoming and have gone out of their way to take care of us. It’s been really wonderful. Only two days left!

Kefkos Roman Cisten
As well as eating a lot we took ourselves off to another beach today, this time at Lefkos. On the way we saw this sign to some Roman Ruins, and couldn't resist investigating.

 

dry stone walls, falling down
Unfortunately, the signs kept directing us to go further, eventually on foot, and all we found were lots of these falling down dry stone walls - definitely not from Roman times!

 

Lefkos beach, seen from the road above, lots of beach umbrellas, but not many people.
Eventually we decided it was too hot, and headed down to the Lefkos beach.

 

Two children play in the sand on a seemingly empty beach, the water behind them.
Once again the water was crystal, and the beach practically deserted - a completely different experience to being here a few weeks earlier, when the beaches were all packed (or so we are told).

 

The sunset colours the waters of lefkos beach, as seen from above on the road coming in.
By the time we left the sun was setting...

 

Looking up at the moon just above a rockscape
And the Moon was rising.

 

Two goats walking along the side of the road above pine forests
On the way back from Lefkos we passed these two goats walking along the side of the road, the bells around their necks clanging in time with their steps. It was a lovely end to the afternoon, as we headed back to Pyles to have dinner and then head down to the cafeneio.

Pigadia & Small Amopi Beach, Greece Day 2

Today was our second full day in Greece, and the 12th day of our trip, and the tension was a little high. The kids were a bit ratty – grumpy and fighting – on and off all day, and perhaps we were too. I think part of it, especially for Liam, was probably that they’re missing the kids we were staying with in Barcelona. It’s like the typical first week of school holidays blues.

Nonetheless we had a great day. We went into Pigadia, the capital of Karpathos, which is also called Karpathos itself and which is really quite a bustling town by comparison to the surrounding villages, like Pyles, where we are staying. Plenty of cafes and lots of shopping, though it was all a bit empty at this time of year. There are 7000 people on the island (more like 35000 in the summer months!), and I’d guess a lot of them either live or at least work there.

Looking back to Pigadia from part way around the bay
Pigadia, looking back from part way around the bay.

We went in there primarily to buy some washing line and sunglasses, since I broke mine on the plane trip here. We got some for both kids too, who have been complaining of the glare a lot. We walked around a bit though, down to the harbour, and around some of the tourist shops.

Then we went to the beach recommended by a woman in the supermarket (who had lived in Geelong, Australia for many years!), Small Amopi, which was awesome. The water was clear and turquoise – it was exactly the sort of beach you expect from a Greek island. There were umbrellas on the beach, many with banana lounges set up under them, and most of the people on the beach were sunbaking on similar lounges. It was only after someone came down and asked us to pay fit sitting under one (€2) that we realized the umbrellas were someone’s business (what did we think? We didn’t, I suppose), and also realized that the empty banana lounges could have been ours for the asking too – €5-6 for two, plus an umbrella. Next time, maybe.

It was a small beach and just lovely for the kids. Quite a steep drop from toe deep to knee deep, but gradual after that, and no surf at all. I took Eliane in for a good swim, then I spent the rest of the time swimming out deeper with Liam, while Chris supervised Mikaela and Elli playing at the edge and in the sand.

Looking along the small amopi beach - umbrellas on the sand, water crystal clear
Small Amopi Beach. Large Amopi is just around the bend, in the direction the camera is looking.

Tonight the great-niece of our absent host popped in to visit us and see if we need anything. She just lives right behind us, with her husband and toddler, but she works in town (Pigadia) during the day. She said we should have a family meal with them on Sunday night – she’ll consult with her mother and let us know the details. Most everyone we’ve met here in the village knows the family who own this house, and I think a good half of them are related!